MISCELLANEOUS



Early Victorian chamber oil lamp

Early Victorian chamber oil lamp

This is what we believe to be an early Victorian, glass chamber oil lamp dating from the early 19th century, c1840.   Similar, earlier examples can be seen in Keith Kelsall's book - "The Open Flame Lamp".
 
The lamp is in excellent condition for its age.  It shows age related wear and tear to both the rim of the bowl and to the rim of the foot consistent with some 200+ years of use. It has a rough pontil mark on the base of the foot.
 
The lamp has an ovoid-shaped bowl reservoir measuring 6.8 cm (2.7 inches) in diameter.  The bowl sits on a baluster stem, consisting of three cushion knops a piece of plain stem and a basal collar.  The stem leads to an upturned "drip...

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Price: £70.00

Early Victorian cut glass scent or salts bottle

Early Victorian cut glass scent or salts bottle

This is what we believe to be an early Victorian, cut glass scent or salts bottle, dating from the beginning of the 19th century, c1840.  
 
The bottle is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows the age related wear and tear to the rim of the base consistent with some 100+ years of use.  
 
The bottle is ovoid in cross-section and has been cut and then polished to produce eight vertical "fins".  There is a thick collar just under the rim which has been heavily cut into eight square panels each of which sports an eight-spoke star cut into the surface.  The design is replicated on a basal collar.  The polished base is plain and...

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Price: £35.00

Late 19th century end of day frigger in the form of bellows

Late 19th century end of day frigger in the form of bellows

This is what we believe to be a late 19th, or early 20th century, glass frigger in the form of a pair of bellows featuring the Prince of Wales feathers.  Friggers were end of day items blown by glassmen using the remaining glass in the pot at the end of a shift.  They were allowed to use up the glass and sell what they made from it, but were not allowed to blow pieces that would compete with those they made for their employers.  The result was a range of fanciful end of day pieces, or friggers, that showed off the skills of the glass-blower and which were sold off to augment their salary.  A friend of mine was still making such pieces at Whitefriars in the 1960s.
 
The frigger is in excellent condition for its age.  It...

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Price: £175.00

Late Georgian double lip rinser, basal broad flutes

Late Georgian double lip rinser, basal broad flutes

This is what we believe to be an early Victorian, double lip rinser dating from the middle of the19th century, c1840.  Rinsers were used to rest the small wine glasses used at the time in water so that they were clean for the next wine to be served.  The two lips are thought to allow a rinser to be shared between two people or to allow two different wine glasses to be rinsed at the same time.  Nowadays they are used for pot pourri or sweets and provide an inexpensive antique for the purpose.
 
The rinser is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows the age related wear and tear to both the rim of the bowl and to the rim of the foot consistent with some 180 years of use.  The bowl is nicely...

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Price: £20.00

Late Georgian double lip rinser, plain bowl

Late Georgian double lip rinser, plain bowl

This is what we believe to be a late Georgian, double lip rinser dating from the beginning of the19th century, c1820.  Rinsers were used to rest the small wine glasses used at the time in water so that they were clean for the next wine to be served.  The two lips are thought to allow a rinser to be shared between two people or to allow two different wine glasses to be rinsed at the same time.  Nowadays they are used for pot pourri or sweets and provide an inexpensive antique for the purpose.
 
The rinser is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows the age related wear and tear to both the rim of the bowl and to the rim of the foot consistent with some 200 years of use.  The bowl is nicely...

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Price: £15.00

Late Victorian glass fly trap

Late Victorian glass fly trap

This is what we believe to be a glass, Victorian fly or wasp trap, dating from the end of the 19th century.  These would work by placing a sugar solution in the bottom of the trap.  The insects flew in through the bottom and then drowned in the solution.
 
The trap is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows age related wear and tear to the feet commensurate with 100+ years of use. 
 
The fly trap is of the scarcer double-ogee shape.  It is in the clear colourway and is 17.5 cm (7 inches) in height without the stopper and 20.5 cm (8.2 inches) in height with the stopper inserted.  The trap is 15.5 cm (6.2 inches) in diameter at its widest point. ...

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Price: £60.00


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